Archive for the ‘Company Info’ Category

Should Your Inside Sales Team Be Listening to Music?

May 3, 2011

As the owner of a company that not only has their own inside sales team that is outsourced to clients but also works with companies on sales process and the overall professionalism and productivity of their sales teams, I am often asked the question: “Do you think it is OK for the team to have music on in the background while making sales calls?”

Well, have you ever noticed that when you go to a ballgame, they will play music during the downtime (when the batter is walking to the plate in a baseball game, while the referees are looking at the replay in football, etc.) but when it is time for the game to resume—for the professionals to work—the music stops. In an inside sales environment, we feel that rule should apply to the inside sales team as well.

The inside sales team needs to think about how they are going to help their client when they are off the phone and be able to listen to the prospects (not the sports scores or the new #1 song) when they are on the phone. My feeling is: Treat a professional as a professional and you have a better chance of getting professional results.

I discussed this with a sales manager not too long ago and his response was “Whatever works to increase sales is worth a try.” This reminds me a lot of something an old boss used to say: “When you are deciding if what you are doing is right or wrong, picture it as the front page story in the newspaper that day.” I learned very quickly that different people read different newspapers. Some read the Chicago Tribune and think twice about what they are doing, knowing their friends and family will see it and judge. Some read the Wall Street Journal, and everything they do is all business all the time. Others (hopefully very few) read the National Enquirer and will simply do anything at any time, even if it includes, lying, cheating and stealing.

Not everything that increases sales is what should be done for long term success.

Something about music in an inside sales environment just seems unprofessional. From years of helping clients investigate how they could improve their sales process through our Growth Audit and Autopsy Services, I’ve noticed that having to listen to someone listen to music while trying to have a professional call is a pet peeve for many business people, and does not help convey a professional image. No, instead it leads to unhappy clients, wondering why the inside sales representative they are speaking to is not taking a more professional approach. It made me wonder, if there were more inside sales teams working in professional environments rather than “boiler rooms,” wouldn’t the perception of hiring an inside sales team be better too? And wouldn’t that lead to even more clients for all of us?

Thinking of Buying Some Contacts from a Sales List Service? If So, You Better Have a Trained Professional to Scrub Them!

March 14, 2011

Two of the questions we are most often asked when it comes to our Outsourced Sales Service are questions about list services such as Jigsaw, Sales Genie, etc. and the specificity of the information they provide (e.g. contact information, demographics, currency of data etc.) and whether a company such as ours who “scrubs” these lists and finds opportunities for clients will work “success based.”

I figured that it might be helpful to provide you with my responses to these questions.

While we have not worked with every list service specifically, it has been my experience that all services like that are different levels of bad. I mean no disrespect. It is just that no matter how often they check their data, things change quickly. Most of these places will tell you that they update their information every 6 months, but you will still find the contact who died 5 years ago or the guy who left the company 2 weeks after they confirmed their information.

I find this interesting because at least once a week, we get a call at Randolph Sterling Inc., for Mr. Randolph Sterling. Some of the people who have called apparently have befriended Mr. Sterling to the point where he told them it was OK to call him Randy. This is interesting because while I am sure there is a Mr. Randolph Sterling somewhere in the world, he has never worked for my company. I may one day write a blog post about where the name came from, but I can assure you that because I am the founder and CEO of Randolph Sterling, Inc., that the CEO and founder of Randolph Sterling, Inc. is not Mr. Randolph Sterling.

Regardless, at least one list service has it listed that way.

As for the second part of the question, yes, there are companies out there who will take this information and help you to develop relationships and will work “success based.” However, their definitions of success may vary, as may yours.

Our current clients define success several ways. Here are just a few:

  • Finding opportunities with the right prospect.
  • Continuing to follow up with that right prospect for sometimes up to 2+ years or the 7-13 “touches” it takes for them to trust someone they don’t know enough to just have them quote on an opportunity.
  • Continuing relationships with clients by providing customer satisfaction calls and forwarding to their sales team the information that enables them to step in and save problem accounts or provide a new service.
  • Determining if a company that looks like a good fit on paper is actually a good fit. We have several clients who ask us to rate our impression of how difficult a prospect may be to work with because they have limited resources and want to make sure they are working with people who not only value what they do, but will pay for it.
  • Finding the correct decision maker and starting a relationship with them after it was determined that the contact name on the list that was bought was incorrect.

That said, we at Randolph Sterling, Inc. are not just appointment setters or a telemarketing firm whose main goal is to get you in front of someone. Our goal is to understand your business and what makes you great, then do our best to match you up with the right prospects. If you bring us on, we will be an extension of your sales team, working as your inside sales department.

It would be difficult for us to open our doors and keep them open if I didn’t think our team was the best in the world at what we do, and if we didn’t continue to hire and train the best and continue to grow in providing more services at a higher quality for our clients. We don’t hire entry level people or people who work on contingency. We hire experienced professionals and treat both them and our clients as such.

When a Smile Is Your Umbrella, You Get a Lot More Than a Mouthful of Rain

December 27, 2010

I was reading a post on LinkedIn that discussed the value of a smile to closing more deals. I found it interesting.

It is surprising how a smile can change someone’s day for the positive– and certainly help in closing a deal. Of course, we are talking about a genuine smile, one that shows compassion, caring, and a genuine love for what you are doing. Sad to say it, but I’m sure we have all encountered those people who smile and look like the “The Joker” because they really are not showing enjoyment for what they do.

Heck, you only live once so enjoy it. In reality, what do we do during the day that is so awful anyway? OK, so I’m not going to be grinning ear to ear when I am paying my taxes, but so many people get so grumpy when it is time for them to talk to people about what they do or try to sell their product or service. Smile when talking to clients and prospects…and not just in person but on the phone too. Enjoy it!

Yes, I run a sales management company so I may like sales more than the average person, but what can be more fun than getting to talk to people about a problem they have and how you can help to solve it? I get so excited when I see how something I was able to do made my client’s business better or at least alleviate some stress they were having. Who wouldn’t feel great about that?

Death of the Salesman: Are Traditional Salespeople a Thing of the Past?

December 7, 2010

I recently spoke with a woman who worked for a company that “invested heavily in e-marketing and reduced [their] sales force.” She went on to say “It’s been working quite well for the past six months or so. I think that the traditional salesperson is a thing of the past. We still send people to networking events to develop personal relationships, but lead generation is happening for the most part online.”

Now, we at Randolph Sterling have seen a lot of e-marketing with our clients too. However, I don’t think I would agree that the traditional salesperson is a thing of the past.

We have a client that generates 200+ new leads a day for products ranging in price from $5,000-$50,000 through SEO, e-newsletters, etc. They had so many that their salespeople became not much more than order takers, and because there were so many leads, their follow up got bad. The attitude was, “Why call a guy back when I will have 10 more just like him tomorrow?”

But then we came in and added the personal touch by following up on all of the leads that either got skipped over or to which the reps just sent a quote and waited for the prospect to call back. In the first 20 hours of the first week, we had already sold over $300,000 of new business that the company would not have otherwise gotten.

There were two common elements to those sales:

  1. The lead generation system generated a quote to the prospect and showed it was opened. However, when we called, the prospect could not find the quote (often they accidentally deleted it) so we went over the information with them. If we hadn’t, they were going to sign off on another quote they had gotten somewhere else.
  2. The initial quote was usually for a smaller ticket item, often not exactly what the prospect wanted. But, by following up on these “little deals,” we often found that the prospect either needed several of the small pieces over the course of the year, or needed a different piece entirely.

Without the personal attention of a professional salesperson, these deals and many others would have been lost.

Technology is wonderful and certainly has helped the sales industry to change for the better, but based on my experience, my feeling is that the best formula is a strong sales team working with good technology to help attract the right prospects.

Should You Downsize Your Sales Force and Implement a More Automated and Online Marketing System Instead?

November 22, 2010

This is a question that came up in an online Vistage discussion group recently, and those who know me, or regularly read my blog or newsletter already know my answer: NO! An online or automated marketing system will never replace a strong sales force!!!

We’ve spent months and months in our Vistage groups talking about attracting more clients through online marketing systems and at the end of the day what was determined was what we already knew…some companies are sales focused while others are marketing focused, but the most successful companies integrated an approach using both.

Sales is about finding customers while marketing is about bringing customers to you. By having them work together, say by reviewing the report on who reads your e-newsletter and then calling the readers to discuss topics of interest in more detail, or offering a downloadable white paper on a topic of interest then following up with those who downloaded it, will increase the ROI of your marketing programs and reduce the sales cycle (for more details on this topic, click here).

Now, some might disagree with me on this and claim that their sales force isn’t working for them. In those cases I would say the problem is not a matter of having a sales force, but not having the right sales force. For example, if all your salespeople are doing is providing you with information that can be found on Google, fire your salespeople and get better ones (OK, maybe I am being a bit harsh with that.) Good salespeople develop relationships and find the right people for you to work with. If people only bought based on the “facts” they find on Google, anyone who wanted four wheels, an engine, good gas mileage, and a way to get to work would be best served buying a Yugo. When the salesperson digs deeper to find the true pain and how his solution can solve it…well just count how many BMWs and Hummers you pass on the way home tonight.

For companies who have a sales force that spends most of their time working with current clients, or don’t have a sales force at all and the people who do the work also sell it, a better idea would be lead generation. It allows the experts to be the expert. At Randolph Sterling, we have an inside sales force that we outsource to help develop new markets and new prospects. With it, we do not simply find AN opportunity for ourselves or our clients, but THE RIGHT opportunities. Good inside sales teams get a better feel for who your ideal prospects are and work to find you more of the people you want to do business with. You never want to incent them to find ANY opportunity because wasting your time on a bad opportunity can be more detrimental than not having an opportunity at all

 

Should You Adjust Sales Compensation in a Declining Revenue Environment?

September 14, 2010

How one adjusts the compensation of their sales force is something many people have been talking about recently, both on business oriented discussion boards online and in person, privately as well as at well attended events.

On the surface, these are simple questions with several variables. In general, I have always been a supporter of lower salaries with the majority of the upside in total compensation coming from commission, especially when the salesperson controls the sale from start to finish. However, if the product or service being sold has quite a long sales cycle, 9-18+ months perhaps, and is a pretty high ticket item, I would usually say a larger base salary is needed because people do need to eat while they are developing a long term relationship.

The deeper question though is why so many companies are considering changing their compensation. Are they paying their sales people too much up front to begin with? Has the sales cycle just gotten too long? Has their sales team started to buy into the “bad economy” excuse and lost their focus on developing new relationships and growing the ones they have? What exactly is making it a “declining revenue environment?”

In over 20 years of selling and managing salespeople, my response to a change in compensation either by the company or by the salesperson is simply “SELL MORE!” While it isn’t nearly that simple, I would look at all factors of the “declining revenue environment” before making any strong consideration on changes. Plus, we have not even begun to discuss the potential for negative reaction from the salespeople. What would they do if there was a change? Would such a change cause you to risk losing too many of the right people and put you in a steeper declining revenue environment?

Panera Fun

June 10, 2010

Everyone who know me, knows I am a huge fan of Panera. Those who are friends with me on Facebook also know that there has been much discussion recently about how crazy people always seem to find me, especially when I’m at places such as Panera, Corner Bakery, and various airports. Some of my friends suggested I compile my misadventures into a book. However, since work occupies much of my time, and my blogs, a second addition to Closing the Deal, and an idea I have for a book on improving one’s sales force are slightly higher writing-priorities for me right now, I thought I would put together a blog post containing this month’s highlights. (Also, please note I mean no offense to the businesses these events take place at. If it weren’t for them I’d have nowhere to stop while on the road for free Wi-Fi, some good coffee, breakfast, and a show).

May 4

I’m in a Panera Bread checking email—surprise, surprise–when I walk over to refill my iced tea. A guy is standing by the cups where there is a sign that says “Complimentary Water Cups.” He turns to me and says “They haven’t said a damn thing to me. They must be broken” Can’t make this stuff up!

Top of Form

May 6

Yesterday I had lunch at a Mexican place…not realizing it was Cinco de Mayo. The bartender was complaining…”Why do so many people come to Mexican restaurants on Cinco de Mayo. People don’t go to French restaurants on Bastille Day!”

May 10

Panera Bread is the greatest place to go for comedy. In today’s installment, I’m eating lunch and sitting at a table next to three women while I’m checking my email. One of them says to the other something about her brother “you know, the smart one. The one that’s in jail.” Um, the SMART one is in jail? Where, exactly is the dumb one?

May 14

Another “crazy people in coffee shops.” Breakfast at Corner Bakery. A woman was doing surveys on the French Toast I got, so I jokingly asked “so what do I get?” 10 minutes of who knows what she was saying and then she walked away…comes back a minute later and says “they wouldn’t let me give you a &^%$ing cookie. They won’t even give me a damn cup of coffee!” Trust me, you don’t need any more caffeine in your system!

May 23-26 (Airports)

While waiting to board my flight the other day the guy next to me cleared his throat every 45 seconds. Don’t think it’s annoying? Try it for 5 minutes!

Where has customer service gone? Last week the gate agent was mad at me because her machine couldn’t read my ticket. Sorry you had to key in my seat number, must have been a huge challenge.

More crazy people. Lady started in the aisle seat, moved to the window, then the middle—it’s only a two hour flight; you weren’t flying to Guam!

June 1

More Panera fun…lady on the phone while her pager keeps buzzing and she does nothing. An annoyed guy grabs it and says “Hey Galileo, I didn’t realize the universe revolved around YOU, not the sun!” After a good zinger, I didn’t have the heart to tell him that it was Copernicus who stated that the Earth revolved around the sun.

Can’t Invest in Sales Rep Development? How Can You Afford not To?

June 2, 2010

I went to visit a prospect last week who started out his conversation with me by saying, “I’m not really sure why you are here, we have a sales manager and our reps are supposed to be doing their own phone calls. What can you do for us?”

“Good question,” I replied, trying obviously to sound as intelligent as I could while wondering if this was going to be the shortest meeting on record. “Well let me ask you this, why did you agree to meet?”

“I feel like our guys are doing well, but they don’t seem to be progressing, and I thought maybe you could help with that.” OK, now we are off to the races.

“What do you do to invest in their continued development?” Now I’m starting to think there is a chance that this meeting will last past the two minute mark.

“We’ve done training courses, brought in motivational speakers, even set up sales contests, but none of that stuff has brought anything new to the table. Maybe our guys are just good for a period of time then we’ve gotten all we can out of them.”

“How often do you meet with them?” I responded, hoping I could find a way to help.

“We meet as a group once a week to discuss what is working well and what isn’t. I usually hear about these great opportunities that are on the horizon, but very rarely do they talk about anything getting in their way. They seem to have all of the tools needed to succeed. I mean, they are not doing poorly, but they seem to be pretty comfortable with where they are.”

Before making any recommendations or even telling him more about what we do, I asked him if he would allow me to interview one or two of his guys and then meet with him again to see if there is a way to help. He agreed.

What I found was that he was right. They had done several training courses and motivational speakers, which got their guys excited for change for about 10 minutes. They also did have a weekly meeting which, for the most part, nobody ever opened up in because they didn’t want the other reps to think they were having problems, and they certainly did not want the manager knowing they were struggling, especially when the numbers showed they were just fine.

This is a problem we saw way too often…salespeople who need additional help but don’t want to go to their colleagues or manager for fear of looking badly. We recommended that he take two of his guys…the top guy and the bottom guy, and put them in our SAM peer advisory groups for three months. SAM groups are designed specifically to have sales and marketing professionals develop their sales skills outside of the regular work environment. It allows them to work with other, non competing sales professionals and learn from each other’s experience, holding each other accountable for goals (real goals, not the “make my manager happy” goals that many had been setting) and helping each other out.

After the first meeting of each of his reps (the top rep was in an Executive SAM Group while the “bottom rep” was in a regular SAM Group) even before I had a minute to call him, I received a call from the sales manager. “These guys loved it,” he exclaimed. “Now let’s see if it makes any changes. Call me in two weeks and we will see.”

I called him back in two weeks to find that both had made tremendous gains in attitude, which was turning into more dollars in everyone’s pockets.

“What the heck do you guys talk about in these meetings? We’ve got to bring you into our weekly meeting to share it with everyone else!”

I explained to him that first of all, every meeting, like every salesperson, is unique and that SAM meetings contained no “special sauce.” People get out of it what they put into it. I next explained that while I would love to be a part of their weekly meeting, I didn’t think that was the best course of action and, in fact, suggested he scrap the weekly meeting entirely. “It is a waste of everyone’s time. Nothing new gets discussed and they don’t want you or the guys they are working with to know they have problems, especially when the problems are internal.”

I suggested that we put each of his guys in a different SAM group, reinvesting the time and money he had spent on weekly meetings and motivational speakers into something where his people were learning, growing and most importantly, knew that the company really did care about their growth and not just about how much money they were going to make for them.

Interested in seeing if you qualify to join a SAM group in your area? Contact us at info@randolphsterling.com for a schedule and application.

Spring, Baseball, and Sales

May 23, 2010

It looks as though spring may have finally sprung in Chicago after a long wait. Of course, I was playing softball last Monday night and we were still factoring in a wind chill. At least it should be warmer in Raleigh, where daytime highs are already hitting 90. Thinking about our softball team (which hopefully any day now will start playing to its potential) always reminds me of how glad I am that I started playing baseball as a kid, as it has been a great help for a career in sales. Other than weatherman, professional ball player, and salesperson, what professions are there where you can you fail 70% of the time and be considered the best in the business? I certainly don’t want a brain surgeon who has those success rates…heck, I don’t want a chef with those success rates!  Every call you make, just like every at bat in a game, the law of averages shows will not be successful. In both the baseball and the sales profession, if you go in thinking this time will probably be one of the 70% that does not work out, I am pretty sure you will be correct.

So what is it that both of these professions have in common cause people to keep doing them, other than the potential to make a lot of money? First and foremost, it is a positive attitude, the belief that you will succeed. I was watching Bull Durham for probably the 100th time over the weekend. In one of the last scenes, young phenom “Nuke” LaLoosh has just gotten called up to the majors and he is in the locker room preparing to leave as his mentor “Crash” Davis walks in. (Now that I think about it, maybe that is what the sales industry needs, more nicknames!) Davis tells him that while he might not be successful when he first gets to “The Show,” the key to his success is “fear and arrogance.” What he means is that he has to know in his heart that he is good—better than his competition no matter if he just struck the last guy out or he hit a home run. It is the same thing in sales. The last guy may not have needed your product or service, heck, he may have even hung up on you, but the next call is a new opportunity to show what you have to the right person. Go get ‘em!

What Is Your Strategy to Strive in the Recovery?

May 19, 2010

So…what is it? One thing is for certain: even if you continued to grow over the past few years, you will be continuing to look for different ways to reach new prospects and turn them into clients. Have you developed a plan yet?

One of the companies we are working with really understands this. They have been in their field for over 100 years, so they have seen it all. When they first came to us, my thought was “What can we show them that they hadn’t seen before?” This is the usual first question I have when preparing to meet a new sales management prospect. It reminds me to make sure I am asking enough of the right questions to allow us to work with them to develop a customized solution that fits their culture and growth goals. No cookie cutter solutions here.

What I found was exactly the opposite of what I expected—isn’t that always the case?

This company is at the top of their field, so while you might think they would be reaping the benefits of the “smaller guys” not being able to survive, they were seeing the little guys trying to infiltrate their turf—the larger clients. We interviewed several of the key players in the company to get their opinion about this.

“They are just worrying about price,” said one manager. “They are insured if he messes up.”

“We haven’t been writing any fewer proposals,” stated another. “But we are just not getting as many projects as we used to.”

This was a common theme among the people we talked to at the company. Our next step was to talk to their clients and prospects.

“They are top notch. We know when we work with them, it will be done right,” a long time client told us. “They are certainly not the cheapest out there, but neither are we.”

“We have worked with them for years. Sure, the number of projects we have had lately has slowed a bit, but as we continue to bounce back, they will be a part of that recovery. We need to work with good people who make us look good,” was the feedback from another happy client.

We interviewed another prospect who they had done many, many, many proposals for but had never gotten the job, so we asked why not. “Oh, they are always so expensive. We can usually find someone else for 20% cheaper,” he said.

“To do the same work?”we questioned, in hopes of finding a differentiator.

“Yep, same stuff,” was his response.

Hmmm. I’m curious. If they are always so much higher, why do you continue to ask them for proposals?” I asked.

After pondering the question for less than a second, he responded “I know they are the best at what they do, but also the most expensive. If I can get a proposal from them, it keeps these cheaper guys in check.”

We had noticed that this was now the second time he used the word cheaper.

“So what happens to you if the cheaper guy screws up?”

“We have insurance for that,” he stated.

“How often does that happen?”

“Oh, it isn’t too bad, just a couple times a year. In fact, we just changed our policy. It was getting too expensive with the old one.”

Wait…what? “You use your insurance policy a couple of times a year? That must be quite expensive, and probably a pain to keep changing policies.”

“It is. Why do you know a good insurance guy?”

“I do, but I think I know a better way for you to keep these costs in check…”

You can see where this is going. Part of the recommendation we are currently implementing for this client revolves around first looking for the right prospects, which lowered the amount of proposals they wrote but increased the number that they won, and next getting their team to be more comfortable asking more questions to get to the root of the pain of their client. They really didn’t want the least expensive person working on their job, they just didn’t see how much that lower cost option was costing them in claims, increased policy costs, increased administrative time in processing this cost and/or finding a new agent, and the potential for losing their job when they realized the bad PR they were getting by not doing it right in the first place.

By digging deeper to find a customized solution that fit their team, we were able to help them thrive in all seasons.

If you or a colleague are staring the recovery in the face and saying, “What can we do to capitalize on this?” give us a call. Our sales management team would love to talk to you about it further and see if we can be of help. For more information about Randolph Sterling’s sales management options, please contact us at 919-439-3710 or check us out on the web at www.randolphsterling.com.